Alien distribution

From 1961-1969, 1.5 million zoea larvae, 10,000 1-3 year old juveniles (50% females and 50% males) and 2,609 5-15 year old adult (1,655=females, 954=males) P. camtschaticus from West Kamchatka, was intentionally released by Russian scientists in the Kolafjord in the east Barents Sea (Russia) to create a new and valuable fishing resource in the region (Orlov and Karpevich, 1965; Orlov and Ivanov, 1978). Since then, the member of this crab has successfully formed a resident self-reproducing population that is currently widely distributed in coastal waters off Russia and Norway.

  1. Orlov, Y.I. & Karpevich, A.F. 1965. On the introduction of the commercial crab Paralithodes camtschatica (Tilesius) into the Barents Sea. Pp. 59-61, In: Cole, H.A. (ed.) ICES Spec. Meeting 1962 to consider problems in the exploitation and regulation of fisheries for Crustacea. Rapp. P.-v. RĂ©un. Cons. Int. Explor. Mer, 156: 59-61.
  2. Orlov, Y.I. & B.G. Ivanov 1978. On the introduction of the Kamchatka king crab Paralithodes camtschatica (Decapoda: Anomura: Lithodidae) into the Barents Sea. Mar. Biol., 48(4): 373-375.

Fig. 5. The distribution of the red king crab (Yellow shading) in the native northern Pacific, Otkhotsk and Bering Sea and the non-native distribution in the Russian and Norwegian southern Barents Sea.Fig. 5. The distribution of the red king crab (Yellow shading) in the native northern Pacific, Otkhotsk and Bering Sea and the non-native distribution in the Russian and Norwegian southern Barents Sea. From:NOBANIS – Invasive Alien Species Fact Sheet

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