Distribution and habitat

The goblin shark has been caught in fishing nets in all major oceans with some documented sightings in shallower seas such as the Mediterranean  and more recently the Gulf of Mexico (Parsons et al 2002). They have been most documented on the upper continental slopes at depths of around 250-1000 metres. Although it has been reported that a goblin shark tooth was found embedded in a deep sea cable at the bottom of the Indian ocean at a depth of 1370 metres.  The recorded sighting in the Gulf of Mexico was of significant importance because it was the second  goblin shark ever to be caught in this sea, it provided evidence that the sharks come up from the deep sea to  shallower waters of continental coasts to feed (Parsons et al 2002).  Due to the most sightings and being an occasional bycatch from fishing in these areas it has been suggested that  seamounts are a habitat which this species relies upon for hunting and possibly mating (Kukuyev 1982). As stated on the extreme habitats page, seamounts can sustain a complex ecosystem upon which many different species of marine organisms utilize for food.

Distribution map of M. owstoni. Blue dots represent recorded captures/ sightings with red dots being the most latest >2014.
Fig. 7. Distribution map of M. owstoni. Blue dots represent recorded captures/ sightings around the world with red dots being the most latest in the Gulf of Mexico and Sri lanka. (Image free to use & share)

I would take the distribution map of the goblin shark with a pinch of salt as many of the actual captures are rarely reported to the right agencies thus making it very hard for ichthyologists to determine the species actual distribution and life history.

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